typography, we meet.

the beginning, or an introduction…

(via Swiss Miss)

For my design class our second blogging assignment for our “digital notebook” was to find examples of different type races and categories in magazines, ads, and designs. The definitions for each type face below are taken from my class textbook.

Oldstyle Serif: One of the three divisions of the serif race. Based on the proportions of hand lettering. Has little differentiation between thick and thin strokes and relatively short x-height.

The Yale typeface was inspired by the 15th century Venetian typeface that was first found in the book De Aetna.

The Venetian typeface was designed to look like the handwriting of Italian Renaissance scholars.

Transitional Serif: One of the three divisions of the serif race that is based on drafting and geometry. Characters include a tall x-height and a slight differentiation between thick and thin strokes.

Baskerville type was created by John Baskerville in 1735.

Georgia is the font used by most websites. It was one of the first typefaces designed for the screen due to its larger x-height.

Modern Serif: One of the three divisions of the serif race, based on technological advances in printing processes. A dominant characteristic is that it has straight lines for serifs.

(via Swiss Miss)

(via Swiss Miss)


Grotesque Serif: One of the three divisions of the sans serif face. It has serif proportions without the serifs. Characteristics include tall s-heights and the type is relatively narrow.

Helvetica.

Geometric Sans Serif: One of the three divisions of the sans serif race that has perfect circular corners.


Humanist Sans Serif: One of the three divisions of the sans serif race, based on hand rendering and therefore has differences between thick and thin lines.


Blackletter: One of the oldest typefaces that looks like calligraphy. The Washington Post, the New York Times and the Chicago Tribune used this typeface.

Novelty: A decorate race type in which characters are often illustrated.

(by Jessica Hische)

Jessica Hische started the Daily Drop Cap, a project where she designed a decorative letter every day.

(by Gesa Hansen)


Script: A race or type similar to cursive handwriting.

(script in “Jane Austin)

Square Serif: A race or type characterized by square or slab-like finishing strokes.

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